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Paper fans encouraging people to vote and commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery march are displayed inside a mason jar at Lowndes Interpretive Center, Feb. 3, 2015, in Hayneville, Ala. Dallas County Sheriff Jim Clark, Alabama state troopers, and newly deputized local citizens attacked civil rights demonstrators attempting to cross Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge, March 7, 1965. More than 60 protesters were hospitalized due to their injuries, and the day became known as “Bloody Sunday.” The violent confrontation marked a pivotal turning point in the Civil Rights movement. On March 21, 1965, activists crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge and marched 54 miles to the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery. The Voting Rights Act was passed, Aug. 6, 1965, outlawing poll taxes, literacy tests, and other methods used to prevent blacks from voting. (Photo by Carmen K. Sisson/Cloudybright)
Copyright
2015 Carmen K. Sisson/Cloudybright
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3035x4689 / 40.8MB
Contained in galleries
Selma, Alabama
Paper fans encouraging people to vote and commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery march are displayed inside a mason jar at Lowndes Interpretive Center, Feb. 3, 2015, in Hayneville, Ala. Dallas County Sheriff Jim Clark, Alabama state troopers, and newly deputized local citizens attacked civil rights demonstrators attempting to cross Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge, March 7, 1965. More than 60 protesters were hospitalized due to their injuries, and the day became known as “Bloody Sunday.” The violent confrontation marked a pivotal turning point in the Civil Rights movement.  On March 21, 1965, activists crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge and marched 54 miles to the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery. The Voting Rights Act was passed, Aug. 6, 1965, outlawing poll taxes, literacy tests, and other methods used to prevent blacks from voting. (Photo by Carmen K. Sisson/Cloudybright)