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University of Mississippi students Nathaniel Weathersby and Renee Ombaba sit on the steps of the Lyceum and talk with Susan Glisson, executive director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation, July 30, 2013, in Oxford, Miss. Ombaba and Glisson organized a candlelight unity walk last fall after a racially-charged skirmish broke out on campus following the re-election of President Barack Obama. Weathersby is president of the UM Pride Network, which works to make campus a safer, more positive environment for gay and lesbian students, and Ombaba helped spearhead the Collegiate Council for Civil Rights Commemoration, which uses historical events of the civil rights movement as teachable moments to improve race relations on campus. The Lyceum was the site of violence in October 1962, when riots broke out after James Meredith enrolled as the first black student on campus. (Photo by Carmen K. Sisson/Cloudybright)
Copyright
2013 Carmen K. Sisson/Cloudybright
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4928x3264 / 46.1MB
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Tallahassee, Florida - Defending the Dream: Today's Civil Rights Activists
University of Mississippi students Nathaniel Weathersby and Renee Ombaba sit on the steps of the Lyceum and talk with Susan Glisson, executive director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation, July 30, 2013, in Oxford, Miss. Ombaba and Glisson organized a candlelight unity walk last fall after a racially-charged skirmish broke out on campus following the re-election of President Barack Obama. Weathersby is president of the UM Pride Network, which works to make campus a safer, more positive environment for gay and lesbian students, and Ombaba helped spearhead the Collegiate Council for Civil Rights Commemoration, which uses historical events of the civil rights movement as teachable moments to improve race relations on campus. The Lyceum was the site of violence in October 1962, when riots broke out after James Meredith enrolled as the first black student on campus. (Photo by Carmen K. Sisson/Cloudybright)